What Is Abuse?

Not All Abuse Is Physical

Understanding the different ways a person can be abused help us to spot warning signs and be empathetic.

Economic Abuse

Stopping you from getting a job, taking your money, making you ask for money, harassing you at work, making you justify your spending.

Isolation

Controlling what you do, who you see and talk to, where you go, cutting you off from your friends and family.

Physical Abuse

Any physical act intended to hurt or intimidate. Including slapping, punching, kicking, shoving, locking out of home, abandoning in unsafe place.

Sexual Abuse

Making you do sexual things against your will, inappropriate touching, child molesting, attacking the sexual parts of your body.

Intimidation

Causing fear through use of facial expressions, tone of voice, gestures, smashing things, destroying property, stalking, harassing.

Emotional Abuse

Putting you down, making you feel bad, name calling, mind games. Jealousy, making you doubt yourself.

Using Children

Making you feel guilty about the children, sending messages through the children, using visitation to harass you, telling you that you are a bad parent.

Threats

Threatening to take children, commit suicide or homicide, report you to welfare, hurt your pets or loved ones.

The Cycle of Abuse

IN CANADA

Canadian Survey on Domestic Violence and the Workplace (2014)

Canadian data was urgently needed to support advocacy and improve workplace domestic violence policies in Canada. Researchers at the University of Western Ontario, in partnership with the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC), conducted the first ever Canadian survey on domestic violence in the workplace. Stronger evidence should help to shape legislation, policies, and practices that promote violence prevention and safety in workplaces.

OUT OF ALL THOSE SURVEYED:

1 in 3 Experienced Domestic Violence Personally

OF THOSE WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE PERSONALLY:

1 in 3 say they stay affected

Most Said

The Takeaway

Domestic Violence effects Canadian workplaces. Domestic violence was most commonly disclosed to co-workers and supervisors/managers.

Most believed that it impacts the work lives of those experiencing abuse ‘quite a bit’ or ‘a whole lot’. And yet, most also thought that employers and union officials are not aware when domestic violence is affecting workers.

Wathen, C. N., MacGregor, J. C. D., MacQuarrie, B. J. with the Canadian Labour Congress. (2014). Can Work be Safe, When Home Isn’t? Initial Findings of a Pan-Canadian Survey on Domestic Violence and the Workplace. London, ON: Centre for Research & Education on Violence Against Women and Children.

IN NORTH BAY

In 2014:

1167
related calls
315
charged for domestic related offenses

In 2015:

1256
related calls
273
charged for domestic related offences

What Does This Tell Us?

Domestic violence is, and continues to be, present in our community.
It effects North Bay businesses and their productivity.

Resources For Employers Resources For Everyone